How is your day as a writer?

Do you ever have a day like this?

You know the kind. One step forward and two steps back. Come on fess up.

I’ll admit some days this is more or less how I write. LOL

Good morning! Fueling up!

 

 

Just one quick look.

 

 

 

 

Research location. Where oh where to put this story? Oh, I’d love to visit Paris. I’ll check flights. Won’t take a minute.
Time to rock-n-roll! I got this.

 

Need to chat with my critique partner. Just one question. My we have a lot to catch up on.

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s see what everyone is doing. Just one quick look.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time to make the magic happen!
WTF did I write that for? Editing, editing, and more editing.
Maybe I need a little adaptation research.

 

 

 

 

 

 

She didn’t post that picture! On no.

 

 

Happy hour! It’s five o’clock somewhere. Tomorrow is another day. Cheers!

Hope you this brought a little fun to your week.

But do tell me. Am I wrong?

Do you write without distraction, nose to the computer?

Talk to me – I love reading your comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say “hey!”  I’ll leave a light on. 

Images courtesy of Pixabay and GIPHY

 

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Want to know why you need to leave a review?

Do you know why this is important?

I mean really important?

It helps a writer? Yes, of course. But there is more to it than that.

When we eat out, we leave the wait staff a tip. Even if the service is lousy, we leave a tip. Might be small, but we leave something behind. The staff worked hard to provide the meal, and our tip our acknowledgment. We may never return to that restaurant again, but that’s okay.

The same thing holds true for a book. The author works hard to produce a product for readers to enjoy. Some will enjoy the story more than others, but everyone should leave behind a tip (review.) Short and sweet, or long and eloquent, leave a review it doesn’t matter.

Don’t know what to say? Here’s a tip: read what others have said and to get ideas, to prime your thoughts into your own words.

Don’t have time to write a wordy review? Click on the stars but leave behind that tip with a one or five star review.

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Remember to let the author know you read their book. The best way to do that is to write a review. Leaving your footprints in the sands of Amazon and Goodreads is important.

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What has kept you from leaving a review in the past?

Was it fear? Didn’t like the book? Didn’t know what to say?

Think you could leave a short review now?

Talk to me – I love comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say “hey!”  I’ll leave a light on. 

Keep reading for more about reviews!

Book Reviews: Why They’re So Important to Authors

Why the Right Book Reviews are So Important for Authors

HOW IMPORTANT ARE BOOK REVIEWS?

To delete now or later that is the question.

One question of so many!

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Last week I read a post by one of my fav authors What Am I Working On? Glad You Asked…. His post got me

My internal editor is never quiet.

I go back over and over a chapter, too many times I’m sure before I can continue. Makes my writing process slow as molasses.

What was it about Dan’s post that caught my eye?

Crutch words. Or some of you may know them as filler words.

crutch-words

Dan let his manuscript rest for a year before beginning the editing process and culling out crutch words. Now that’s what I call discipline.

It’s not bad to use these words. They make great place holders for an idea, thought or dialog. However, too many a story makes me look more of an amateur than I am. Don’t know about you but I want my book to appear as polished as possible.

  • So just how do we find crutch/filler words? See, told you I had more questions.
    • Use a word counter to find words used too often as well as adverbs and repeated phrases. Look at the numbers. As all accounts know, numbers don’t lie.
  • How do we replace them? And with what?
    • After you locate the offending words/phrases, decide if a word adds or detracts to your sentence/paragraph. If the story isn’t altered by deleting the words, then you are on the right track.
  • Why should we change them? 
    • Crutch/filler words make our writing lazy. They detract from the flow and crisp dialog. And in some cases, are down right irritating to the reader.

Writers Helping Writers has a great tip sheet of crutch words. [PDF]Crutch Words – Writers Helping Writers. Check out their website for additional writing tools and books.

So tell me, am I the only writer that gets bogged down with editing too soon?

Do you edit as you go or wait as Dan did?

Are you able to silence your internal editor and get the job done?

Sorry if I sound like a two-year-old with all the questions but I’ve got a curious mind. LOL

As always I’ve listed a few articles at the bottom of this post to aid your process.

Leave me a comment – I love comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say, “hey!” I’ll leave a light on. 

Keep reading!

How Crutch Words Are Holding Back Your Writing

How to Identify your Crutch Words and Highlight Your Style

What to do with a stubborn character

Damned if I know.

I’ve been writing, on and off for the past few months, on a novel. Working on the idea and research for much longer. I was motoring right along when all of a sudden the story began sputtering
empty fuel

Ever happen to you?

In an effort to nudge my protagonist along, I played with the outline and plot adding bits of information here and there, but she wasn’t in the mood. So I turned to my villain who was not in the mood to be evil.

drunk-1013898_640

There was nothing left for me to do but take a break, do more research, read a little, and write a few blog posts.

mud soldiersAt last, I returned to my WIP. Each sentence was like slogging through mud.

 

Then last week, as I was dusting our living room floor, my protagonist began whispering in my ear. She had the nerve to explain how the story should happen.

Whoa! Wait a minute!

Did she expect me to rewrite the whole damn story? Apparently. Well, to be honest, about two-thirds of it.

But, I’ve got to admit, her tale sounded a lot better than the direction I’d dragged around her butt all these weeks.

The premise is still the same. However, the antagonist is a different character, and the twist is much bigger and the bang bolder.

Why did this happen?

Here’s my theory. Over the past months of plotting, outlining, etc., I’ve gotten to know my protagonist. I mean really know her. Like we are best buds. And like best friends, she spoke up telling me what she thought. That’ll teach me to keep my distance next time. Sigh…

So here are my questions for Y’all.

  • Has this ever happened to you?
  • Why do you think this could happen?
  • Did you rewrite or persevere and keep with the original plan?
  • And isn’t it always better to go with bigger, bolder and different?

As always, at the end of this post, I’ve added terrific information for your reading pleasure.

Leave me a comment – I love comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say hey! The lights are on, and I’m waiting.

WHEN A CHARACTER GOES ROGUE

Good Character Writing

6 Secrets of Writing a Novel Without an Outline