What is the focus of your website?

Why do you write what you write?

I’m not asking about writing a book, novel or short story. No, I’m curious about your blog posts. Do you write to share a laugh with friends, experience, knowledge, or…?

What is the purpose of your blog posts?

I don’t know about you but I spend a lot of time writing my blog posts, so understanding why I do that was important to me.

Just what are the reasons for my blog?

Well, there are several, in case you wanted to know.

  • It’s my Fact Book.
    • A great way to keep a notebook of writing tips and tricks in one place.
    • My memory isn’t what it used to be. Need all the help I can get.
    • Who knows, one day I may turn all of these posts into a book.
  • It’s a way for me to share writing tips as I learn them.
    • Old or new, each one is important.
  • It’s a way to connect.
    • Making friends, meeting writers, and reading about their journey.
    • To pass on the information garnered through these new acquaintances.
  • And of course, it’s a way to share books, and stories, I’ve written as well as books I’ve enjoyed reading.

Why am I sharing this with you?

It occurred to me that some of you may wonder why I share so many tips about writing and publishing books because I certainly NOT an expert. But, I share because I enjoy learning every little bit I can about writing.

So, I wondered…

Do you know why you write a blog?

Does your blog serve more than one purpose?

Have you ever considered using your blog as a Fact Book?

Do you consider yourself a writer,  a blogger or both?

Do share! I’d love to know what motivates you to write a blog.

Great reading below! Click on the links.

Keep a Fact Book of Things You Learn Throughout the Day BY Eric Ravenscraft

WRITING A GOOD BLOG By Janine Warner

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Are you writing hyphens in the wrong way?

Writing with hyphens can be tricky business. 

As with the word was, hyphens is another Achilles heel. Sometimes I sprinkle hyphens about like scattering rose petals at a wedding. Too many!

  Even some of the grammar programs disagree. But if you’ve ever published an ebook you’ll see what I mean. And a strayed hyphen can get left behind in print books too.

Hyphens can throw off the formatting until the reader becomes confused as to the meaning of the word. Don’t make the reader turn back pages to figure out what’s happening. 

So what to do with compound words?

Hyphen or not to hyphen that is the question.

Wikipedia

And the answer can be found in a terrific article by Connie J. Jasperson which is filled with lots of do’s, don’ts and tips. Plus, she provides extensive words to remember. This is a definite bookmark.

What did I learn about using hyphens?

  • Even when using “made up” words, tread carefully.
    • Don’t use unless your make-believe world will explode without it. (Oops)
  • Single words and don’t need a hyphen.
  • Only use a hyphen to ensure the meaning of a word.
    • Like, roundup as in a rodeo, or round up as in a review or the next highest round number
  • Some compounds are improvised to fulfill a specific need.
  • There are permanent compounds and temporary compounds. (Who knew.)
  • When in doubt leave it out. Unless…
    • Your intended meaning is clear without the hyphen, leave it out.
  • Add special words and names to your manuscript style sheet.
    • Especially made up words.
    • This will help ensure consistency in your manuscript.
  • Oh, and a hyphen is not an En dash or an Em dash.

So much is packed in her article, I encourage you to click on her link and read the entire thing.

Hyphens #amwriting By Connie J. Jasperson 

 

Do you use hyphens Willie-Nillie?

What do you think?

Is this all old stuff to you?

 

Keep reading, here is another article on using this little devil.

The Punctuation Guide, Hyphen

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Is romance in the air at your house?

We never grow too old for romance.

Want proof? Just look at the romance genre. Sales continue to climb. I’m not talking just about erotica (smut novels per my daughter.)

Want to write a bestselling novel?

Add romance to the formula.

Whether you self-publish or traditional,  write mysteries, women’s fiction, dystopian, YA, LGBT fiction, horror, or thriller, add a little romance and you’ve got a bestseller on your hands.

 

Why?

Because everyone loves a good love story.

Still not convinced? Check out the top Amazon 100 ebooks or the NYT Best Seller list and see for yourself. Read some of the book blurbs, I bet you’ll see lots of references to love. Even one of the hottest new YA futuristic book, Ready Player One by Ernest Cline mentions a love connection. 

So tell me—

Could your current work in progress use a little romance? 

Have you given much thought to how hot the romance genre is?

 

That’s it for today. Short and sweet because I’ve got a big romantic evening to plan. 

So go curl up with a good romantic movie or book and get your groove on. 

 

Another writer’s take on romance. Let’s Talk About Romance –By Jaq D Hawkins

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What is the best length for a blog post?

Is there an ideal length for a blog post?

Well, like all opinions, everyone has one on this subject. Some “experts” suggest 2500 words. Listen, I’m no “expert” but I think that is way too long. Just my opinion. I try to keep my posts between  250-500 words. However, I do add links for those who want to dig deeper and read more in-depth on whatever the subject.

If you love to write long meandering posts, have at it. But I’m busy, and like many of you, I receive dozens of emails every day.

Not wanting to miss anything, I try to read them all. Well, maybe not each and every word. I’ll confess, the longer ones I scan for nuggets of information.  

This past week I received a wonderful compliment from another writer. She likes that my posts are brief and to the point. Thank you, Marian.

“I like too that your posts are not long and laborious, attractive to busy writers like me. Thank you!” – MarianBeaman

Readers may prefer shorter content but search engines will hit more often on longer content. SEO or not, I believe brevity is important.

Readers need to know what to expect from your blog. Long or short, get to the point.

Here are my tips for writing good, consistent blog posts.

  • First, decide your blogging goal.
  • More readers? A shorter blog post may be the way to go. 250-600 words.
  • Selling a product? Very short blog content. Average under 250 words.
  • Desire more comments and conversations on your blog? The ideal blog post length should hit in the middle. 500-600 words.
  • Want more shares on Social Media? Again, hit for the middle. Write an informative article somewhere between 500-600 words.
  • More Google searches? The best blog post length for SEO should be longer. 1000-2500.

Know your audience and keep your blog goals in sight.

Have time to read more details about ideal blog posts? Then click the links below and read these bloggers/writers have to say.

How Long Should Your Blog Post Be? A Writer’s Guide  by Joe Bunting

How Long Should My Blog Post Be? By 

For Blog Posts in 2017, What’s the Best Length for SEO?

Okay, question time.

How long are your average posts?

Have you thought about blog post length?

Do you think articles should be longer or shorter?

Do you prefer to read shorter or longer posts?

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