Do you need help with dialogue?

Do your characters sound realistic?

The dialogue in my work-in-progress sounded a little stilted to me. So I was excited to find a helpful post.

No one wants their characters to sound like robots.

We all want the characters in our story to jump out at the reader. To engage them and give them fun “ah-ha” moments. Maybe connect a character to a friend or family member. Nothing would make me happier than to hear, “That character reminded me of my best friend. Did you spy on us?”

After reading Gina Conkle’s post, I learned…

  • Tags are not stop signs.
    • Use them judiciously.
  • Don’t overuse non-verbal cues.
    • Be creative.
  • Men speak differently than women.
    • This is something we know but forget to incorporate into a manuscript.
    • Viva la difference.
  • Not all character voices are created equal.
    • Men command, women, have conversations.
  • Dyads
    • Even in a group setting, the conversation is between two dominant characters.
    • Unless I’m with my sisters. The five of us talk over each other, and that would present a nightmare to write on paper. LOL
    • Don’t confuse the reader about who is talking to whom.

Gina goes into a lot more detail. Be sure and click on her link and read the entire post. Believe me, her tips are very helpful.

I’m I the only writer who has problems with dialogue?

Do you have a tip or two that you use to make dialogue realistic?

 

How to Create Page-Turning Dialogue by Gina Conkle

 

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Do you need to add a villain to your story?

Then you need to understand your villain.

We’ve heard lots about a protagonist’s motivation and character but often times we forget that the villain is just as important.

I don’t know about you but I struggle with making sure I understand my villain’s motives, back-story, and desires.

How do I go about giving the necessary importance to a villain without overshadowing the protagonist?

Well, when I needed this information, a post from Now Novel popped into my email with all the right answers. There are examples and suggestions to make sure your villain is scary as hell.

What did I learn from this post about bad guys?

  • All villains have a history. Don’t forget to incorporate it into the story.
    • Their backstory explains how they became a villain.
  • Show why the villain has power and influence over the protagonist.
    • Are they scary, intimidating, powerful…
  • Explain how the villain gets away with their devious actions.
    • Sneaky, great liars, pretty, convincing…
  • Let your villain be vulnerable.
    • Everyone, even bad guys have a weak spot, find and exploit.
  • Give the villain a story arc.
    • Do they grow worse, or better over the story?
  • Understand Villain’s motivation.
    • Is it greed, jealousy, hatred…

Click the link at the bottom and read the entire post from Now Novel.

What did you think? Get any ideas for your villain?

Do you have trouble writing about the bad guy?

Leave me a comment, I’m dying to hear from you. 

Creating villain motivations: Writing real adversaries at Now Novel.

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Writers, did you make it to the finish line?

Did you write during the NaNoWriMo challenge?

I’ve never participated in NaNoWriMo but I’m curious about those who have. Knowing how other writers handle the pressure of spitting out 50k words in 30 days fascinates me. Because I agonize over every sentence and rewrite too many paragraphs. Y’all gotta tell me your secret. How do you manage to write so fast?

You’ve probably heard about the terms, plotter, and pantser, but me I’m a plodder. Often taking one step forward and two steps back. I write one word at a time, plodding along as if I’ve all the time in the world. Sigh…

I really need to learn how to speed up my writing and not get squirrelly over every jot and tiddle.

Do tell! 

How many words do you write every day?

Did you finish the challenge?

Did you quit? Why?

How do you manage to balance life responsibilities and the pressure of NaNoWriMo? Especially over the holidays!

Did participating in NaNoWriMo lead to a successful novel?

Don’t want to write a long comment?

That’s okay. Just type- “I DID.” 

 I’m also curious as to how many writers participated in NaNoWriMo, successfully or not.

See, I have lots of questions, and can’t wait to hear about your experience.

For those of you who’ve been living under a rock and don’t know what NaNoWriMo is all about, I’ve added a few links.

National Novel Writing Month

Online Creative Writing Courses for NaNoWriMo Participants …

Participating in NaNoWriMo 2017? Caution! – Jerry Jenkins

NaNoWriMo Is Big for Writers—and It Helps Publishers, Too

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