How to honor and say thanks to the right people

You’re delirious with happiness. You’ve typed The End. But there is more work to do. We need to remember, someone helped us over the top. 

On the road to success, who helped you? Who encouraged you? There are a lot of people you need to add to the acknowledgment page.

How to master the acknowledgment page like a pro.

I recently had this very discussion with another writer. So, I was so excited to read a couple of good articles, Who Are You Going to Acknowledge in Your Book? By Judith Briles and Write Your Book Acknowledgments (Without Stressing Over It)By Tucker Max that gives us a good guideline.

What I learned from their articles:

  • Don’t get sloppy. People are going to read this page too.
  • Make a list before you start. Hopefully, this will prevent you from forgetting someone.
  • Important first and be specific as to why you are acknowledging them. What did they do to help you?
  • There is a difference in a dedication page and an acknowledgment page.
  • Dedication is short and sweet, usually mentions one or few people. And placed at the front of the book.
  • Acknowledgment is for everyone who helped you get to the end and is at the back of the book. You can mention, friends, family, beta readers, and all of the professionals that contributed to your book. Like designers, writing groups, even you’re babysitter. If you are grateful to someone for their help, add them here.
  • Be sincere, your readers can spot fake. But don’t go on and on either.
  • Unlike the dedication, the acknowledgment section can be as long as you need it to be. You need to find the between style and long-windedness.
  • However, if you don’t want to list each and every person, for fear of missing someone or not getting it right, you can do a blanket thank all type of acknowledgment. The choice is yours.
  • With both the Dedication Page and the Acknowledgment Page, make it personal. Make it readable and let your thankfulness shine through.

My two cents:

  • Unless you are certain they wouldn’t mind. Ask. Ask before you print someone’s name in your book. Even on the acknowledgment page. Better safe than sorry. Plus I think it’s considerate to ask permission.
  • Also, the Acknowledgment Page is optional, not mandatory. However, remember someone helped you finish and publish that book. Say thanks.

Click and read this important post to get it right.

Who Are You Going to Acknowledge in Your Book?

Write Your Book Acknowledgments (Without Stressing Over It)

Tell me…

Do you have an additional tip?

Who did you add to the acknowledgment page of your book?

Who do you think should be acknowledged?

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Are you searching for a good writers group?

Well, look no further. Because I’m ready to introduce you to a fellow blogger and author who has it all together.

Today, I’m pleased to welcome Ryan Lanz. 

Hello Jean! Thanks for having me on.

Ryan, tell my readers a little about yourself. Where you’re from, and about your family life.

I’m from the Midwest, USA, although I was born and raised in Hawaii. However, I moved from Hawaii to California when I was a teenager. I’ve lived in the Midwest since my younger 20’s. There’s no beach, but the thunderstorms are great. Most of my immediate family still lives in Hawaii.

I enjoy billiards, traveling, scuba diving, and writing.

Ooh, Hawaii. One of my favorite vacation places. I do hope your family is safe from the volcano eruptions I’ve been reading about. 

Thank you. Some of my family lives on the island of Oahu, where there isn’t an active volcano. My grandparents live not far from the active volcano, but it seems they’re in the clear.

I understand you have some news to share. Do tell. 

I’ve recently relaunched A Writer’s Path Writers Club, which is a club where authors receive free and discounted writing-related services, such as editing, book cover design, book coaching, formatting, narration services, etc. www.patreon.com/AWritersPath

We’re excited to have the group we do, and it’s bustling pretty well.

When and why did you begin writing?

I first started writing as a teenager, although it was awful. I didn’t start to polish my writing until well into my 20’s, in my opinion. But it was an important stage of my life to try.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

I’d say when I started writing my first novel, which will likely never see the light of day. I’m still glad I wrote it, though.

What inspired you to write your first book? 

It sounds corny but the ability to create something new out of nothing. It’s literally anything you want out of a complete void. I think that concept is neat.

Do you have a specific writing style? Is there anything about your style or genre that you find particularly challenging? 

I write in quite a few genres, mostly under a pen name, so that sometimes is a challenge, marketing wise. It’d certainly be easier to market in the same genre.

Who designs your book covers?  

I offer a book design service where I contract out to different designers, all under one roof. I also provide other services, ranging from book coaching, editing, manuscript evaluation, formatting, etc.

Who is your favorite writer, and what is it about their work that really strikes you?

My favorite author of all time is the late Robert Jordan regarding the Wheel of Time series. I would trade quite a bit to read anything more by him. In some ways, I’m tempted to read the last book of the Wheel of Time series the same way Desmond wants to read Our Mutual Friend in the TV show Lost.

Do you see writing as a career?

Absolutely. I love self-publishing. I’d rather have a smaller passive income than a large one-time or temporary income. It starts out small, but it can be built over time, brick by brick.

Did you learn anything during the writing of your recent book?

I find that I learn something new when writing each story, no matter the length. Sometimes, it’s a writing mechanic and sometimes it’s learning about a new type of character.

Any advice for other writers?

It’s been said before, but just remember that a writing career is a long-term thing. It’s playing the long game. So, if you’re in it, be prepared for the long haul. Sometimes it’s long-term before many rewards, but I believe the rewards are long term.

 

Do you have a blog or website readers can visit for updates, events and special offers?

Yes, I do. My writing tips website is www.ryanlanz.com and as mentioned, my Writers Club website is www.patreon.com/AWritersPath.

New things are coming out weekly and sometimes daily. It’s certainly an exciting time.

Readers, if you want to know more about Ryan his website and writers club, check out the links below.

https://www.patreon.com/AWritersPath

https://www.amazon.com/Ryan-Lanz/e/B00Z2GM95G/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

https://ryanlanz.com/my-books/

https://ryanlanz.com/

PLEASE TAKE ANOTHER MINUTE AND LOOK ME UP ON SOCIAL MEDIA BY CLICKING ON THE LINKS BELOW.
AND STOP BY JEAN’S WRITING ANYTIME, I’LL LEAVE A LIGHT ON. 

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Want know how to improve your writing?

Dig Deep.

Use ambiguous words.

Did you know the word “break” has 75 different meanings!

Would you like a quick link to help you discover ambiguous words? 

Well, you’re in for a treat. Because I’ve discovered a terrific website that has done most of the work for us. I know, I know we all use dictionary websites but this is totally different. Below is a link for hypernym, hyponym, and synonym of a word. And having all that info at your fingertips might just improve your story. 

Go check it out and let me know what you think.

Could knowing the 51 different ways to use the word “make” help your writing?

Had you ever thought about it before?

Do tell.

Ambiguous Words List By http://muse.dillfrog.com/lists/ambiguous

Want to know more?

Click:     Improve your novel with these tips

 

Don’t forget to look ME up ON SOCIAL MEDIA BY CLICKING ON THE LINKS BELOW.
AND DO STOP BY JEAN’S WRITING ANYTIME, I’LL LEAVE A LIGHT ON. Leave a light on

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Do you know the difference in a prologue and epilogue?

And

How do you know when a story needs one or both?

My current work in progress (WIP) has a short introduction (prologue.) So, I thought doing a little research on the subject might be in order. After all, I do want the reader to read past the first couple of pages. Right?

Here’s what I learned about the two.

  • A writer can use both to bookend a novel or use just one.
  • A prologue is where you can introduce something important to the story.
  • An epilogue is the cherry on top. The ending after the ending.

What I learned about a prologue.

A prologue should include one or all the three elements.

  1. Setting/fictional world and how the character came to be there.
    • Set the stage with a frame of reference for the reader.
  2.  An event key to the story and a character’s response.
    • Describe with action and suspense, not just adjectives.
    • Perfect place to let the event introduce a theme.
  3. Create intrigue.
    • Set up the reader to keep reading.

My WIP prologue includes #2 & 3.

I’ve not given much thought to epilogues before today. Although, I do enjoy reading a good one that wraps up a story. Especially a book that kept me on edge from beginning to end. A good epilogue relieves tension and enables me to tie all the dangling pieces together in one big knot.

What I learned about writing an epilogue.

  1. Wrap everything up into “happily ever after.”
  2. An epilogue can be used to hint or introduce a sequel.
  3. A place for the characters to reflect on the story.
  4. Show growth and change in a character.

Want to know more? Then drop to the end and click on a few terrific links.

But first…

Me Let's Discuss - Jeanswriting.comHave you ever written a prologue or epilogue for a book?

Do you plan on writing either for your WIP?

Do you like reading either in books?

Or, do you think books are better without either one?

What did I forget?

Talk to me in the comments. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

YOU CAN FIND ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA BY CLICKING ON THE LINKS BELOW.
AND DO STOP BY JEAN’S WRITING ANYTIME, I’LL LEAVE A LIGHT ON. 

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Framing the Novel: The Prologue and the Epilogue By Reba White Williams

What is a prologue (and epilogue)? Examples and tips

Parts of a Novel: What is Foreword, Preface, Introduction, Prologue, and Epilogue?

Prologue & Epilogue