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Do you know how to micro-plot?

Hold on- no charts involved.

I know you’ve heard all about all kinds of plot points. Turning, climax, action, rising, falling, characters, conflicts, well you get the idea. However, for most of us, pantsters, plotter’s, or half-assters we are all looking for better and easier ways to get the job done.

So how about trying micro-plotting?

Yes, you heard right. I just added another plotting point to think about.

What is micro-plotting you ask?

Today I read an article by David Farland about micro-plotting and had an ah-ha moment. If you’ve read many of my posts you’ll know I just love those flashbulb moments.

If I understood David right it’s where you give the reader a reason to care about the characters. A micro-moment in the story. A sympathy point.

So if you feel like something is missing in your WIP, go back and add a note to make the reader care.

In mine, I added stuff like (show Jack is furiousthen found another place to add information about a different emotion I wanted the reader to feel and inserted that (show Em is hurt.)I discovered this sped up my writing process. It stopped me from rewriting the same thing over and over. I could add a little snippet about what I wanted to convey to the reader and get back to the story at large. This gave me the freedom to come back later and write about Em’s frustration.

Want to read David’s article? Click here… David Farland’s Writing Tips

So what do you think?

Will this stop you from getting hung up on rewrites before the first draft is finished?

Is this something you already do?

Do you have a better trick/tip?

Leave me a comment. I love talking to Y’all.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say “hey!”  I’ll leave a light on. 

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When was the last time you backed up your website?

We all back up our computers, either to the “cloud” or to an external hard drive. But what about your blog?

Have you thought about backing up your blog?

What would happen if your blog content vanished? Years of hard work gone in the blink of an eye. How could that happen? WordPress has been around for eons! Ever heard of MySpace? Haven’t? There is a reason.

What would I do should WordPress suddenly vanish into web space?

Cry, eat Bluebell Ice cream and drink Margaritas. Not in any particular order. Then I’d sit down and begin to vent. I mean, write.

Of course, the best thing would be to avoid such a catastrophe.

Here is today’s no excuse, public service announcement, brought to you by Suzanne Bowditch.

Click and read Suzanne’s terrific step-by-step instructions on how to backup your website. Don’t lose that amazing website you’ve slaved over for months.

Backing up your Blog Content by Suzanne Bowditch.

Tell me:

Have you ever backed up your website?

How often do you back up your blog?

Do you think it’s an important or unnecessary part of housekeeping?

Leave me a comment. I love talking to Y’all.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say “hey!”  I’ll leave a light on. 

Do you love creepy, unusual, and odd subjects?

The creepier the better to write my dear.

Am I right?

Well, I’ve stumbled on a couple of terrific ways to expand your imagination. Hang on to your hats.

I love writing prompts. Give me an odd word combos, a challenging word count or subject matter and my mind goes nuts. So I really went bonkers when I stumbled across not one but two totally unique ideas!

Have you ever thought about using mug shots for character development? Not me! Not until now.

Go to Arrests.org and pick a state, any state, you won’t be disappointed. The visual is worth a thousand words.

The mug shots are tagged and categorized for you. Need to describe someone who has had the shit beat out of them? Click on “beat up.”

Or what about locking up your character? Hmm, keep reading.

These great ideas are from Paul M.M. Cooper.

He suggests you put your character in a locked room without windows or furniture. I imagined the room like a padded cell.

What happens? Is the person confused, scared, claustrophobic, or are they calm as they wait for someone to find them?

Want to know more?

Click on these links and read how to write great characters!

Writing mug shots – how a reprehensible website could make you a better writer by Paul M.M. Cooper

The creepiest (and best) creative writing exercise for character-development by Paul M.M. Cooper

Leave me a comment. I love talking to Y’all.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say “hey!”  I’ll leave a light on. 

Are you confident, do you know what to say?

Do you find it difficult to emerge from your writing world?

Confession time. sometimes I’m as tongue-tied as a teenager on her first date. I don’t have a clue what I should say.

Hello, my name is Jean and I’m an introvert.  

More times than not, I prefer to stay home and talk to my imaginary friends. Meeting strangers leave me as tongue-tied as a teenager on her first date. I don’t have a clue what to say. And it seems that with each passing year, I find it more and more difficult.

And Lordy, don’t get me started on promoting my books. I’m a nervous wreck when it comes to that. I rather sit at my computer writing than convince people to buy something I’ve written.

So, just how does an introvert such as myself, have meaningful conversations with strangers?

Prepare.

Prepare for a meet and greet as if we were preparing to write. Because for people like me, networking is hard.

Here is a great article on conversation starters.

10 Handy Conversation Starters for Introverted Writers by

Here’s what I gleaned from Ms. Rowan’s article.

  1. Memorize that elevator pitch. (yuck) But, don’t start off with the pitch.
  2. Remember your manners. Show interest in the other person and listen. Most times, they’ll lead you right into the “pitch.”
  3. Smile, no one wants to talk to a “resting bitch face.”
  4. Break the ice with questions about the event.
  5. Don’t make the entire conversation a sales pitch. (see #2)
  6. Memorize some basic questions so you won’t be tongue-tied. Ms. Rowan gives a good list of icebreakers.

What do you think?

Do you have trouble in these situations?

Do you enjoy seminars, book festivals or book signings?

Is it easy for you to promote your books?

What is your secret to overcoming those butterflies?

Tell me in the comments section. I love hearing from Y’all.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say “hey!”  I’ll leave a light on.