How to take your idea to story

Do you understand how to flesh out your ideas?

Not me, I’m still learning. Taking an idea and writing a full novel is not easy, not easy at all.

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Writing sounds so easy when an idea burst into my mind like fireworks on the 4th of July. But, as they say, the devil’s in the details. And then I’m stumped.

Ever happen to you? Great idea but…

Reading books and articles help me. One of my favorite go-to bloggers is Janice Hardy over at Fiction University. She gives writers good step-by-step instructions to take an idea to finished story.

Another great resource is She Writes. This is a great source for tips on how to flesh out a scene. And isn’t that what makes up a chapter? Scenes?

What did I get from the articles below?

  • know what the scene is about
  • can I relate to my character’s emotions
  • write like no one will read it, go crazy
  • use images to invoke place and time
  • find the problem, find the stakes
  • ask if each scene moves the protagonist toward her goal
  • know what is important to the characters

Tell me – 

Do you have trouble launching your ideas?

Do you have a tip that would help me flesh out an idea?

Read these articles and share the tips helped you. I’d love to know.

I Have An Idea for a Novel! Now What? by Janice Hardy

7 WAYS TO “FLESH OUT” A SCENE POSTED BY ELISABETH KINSEY

Leave me a comment – I love comments.

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Do you think it’s easy to find a book reviewer?

Hate to be the bearer of bad news, but it’s not!

Some writers/bloggers indicate it’s easy to locate willing reviewers. I’m here to tell you it is not. No not easy at all.

I’m not sure if finding reviewers is different that finding people to review a children’s book.

While following all the tips I could find on getting a valuable review, I still found it difficult.

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So what have I learned?

  • Don’t ask a quid-per-quo. You read mine, I’ll read yours.
  • Writers are busy writing. To stop and read my book takes time from their writing.
  • Blogs dedicated to book reviews are swamped with requests. I found most have a “no longer accepting” note on the blog.
  • Contacting a generalized and not to mention lengthy list from Amazon is exhausting. Results are a shotgun effect.
  • To move the needle and generate book sales, you need a lot of reviews.
  • My best source was my readers here at Jean’s Writing. I can’t thank Y’all enough!

What will I do next time?

  • List my book on blogs that connect readers with authors. Amazon frowns on this practice.
  • Use social networks more. Like Reddit, StumbleUpon as well as Twitter and Facebook to search for reviewers.
  • Google! I don’t know why I didn’t think of using this search engine for reviewers. I use it for everything else.
  • Reach out to friends, family and my readers here.

Click and read 10 places to find reviewers for your self-published book by 

books-1841116_640Leave a comment and tell me which tips worked for your books? 

What things did you try that didn’t work?

Do you have any successful tips for getting willing reviewers?
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Is a children’s book reviewer different from a fiction novel?

 

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say hey! The lights are on, and I’m waiting.

Please remember to share this post with your Twitter  peeps and Facebook fans.

Do you have a favorite point of view?

In what POV do you write?

Which do you prefer, 1st, 2nd or 3rd?

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I find that most of the time I gravitate toward 1st, especially when writing children’s books. But sometimes I let the character pick.

Sound crazy? Sometimes I think so. But if I start out in one POV and it doesn’t flow, gets difficult, I change to another. This gives me a different perspective. Let’s me see my characters from a different angle. Often times, my first instinct was right and I go back to the original POV and see what stopped the action. Usually, it wasn’t the POV it was something else that needed fixing.

Doing this exercise helps me see what needs adjusting. Where I went off the rails. I’m not saying one is better than the other because I write in both. To me, the story and the characters determine which POV  I use.

What I like/dislike about 1st and 3rd POV:

  • I like the intimacy of 1st.
    • This can be a two/edged sword.
  • The objectivity of 3rd.
    • Not into the omnipresence/God-like view.
  • Freedom of being all knowing in 3rd.
    • The responsibility of being all knowing.

So I guess that means there is no right or wrong point of view. But how to decide? Me, I let my characters show the way.

Do you think a writer should stick to one POV in all of their stories?

How do you decide which POV to use?

Want to know more about Point of View? Click on the links below.

I love comments, so tell me what you think about POVs. 

Go here to “like” my Facebook page. Facebook at jeanswriting To connect with me, click the “write me” tab or follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com, stop by and say hey! The lights are on, and I’m waiting.

Please remember to share this post with your Twitter  peeps and Facebook fans.

3rd Person vs. 1st Person – Which Is Best? – Novel Writing Help

What Point of View Should You Use in Your Novel?  (First Person? Third Person?) By: 

First or Third? by  TARA K. HARPER

Do you need to jumpstart after a dry spell?

What to do, what to do?

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That’s how I’ve felt for several days. Like Sisyphus pushing my writing up a hill only to have it roll back down again. It’s exhausting not to mention frustrating.

I don’t know about you but when I take time away from writing, for whatever the reason, the stories stop. It’s as if my characters go on vacation too. And when they show back up it is at a most inconvenient time, like in the middle of the night.

Writing my blog, my book, short stories, my journal… Whew! Sometimes it’s all too much but I love it! Crazy right?

However, if I stop the well runs dry. So how do I prime the pump?

I’ve had to get inventive to get my imagination going again. Believe me, it’s not always easy.

Here’s what I do to get my ideas popping.

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  • Read!
    • Any and everything, Facebook, Twitter, StumbleUpon, Emails (you get the idea)
    • Favorite books, new genres, something different-uncomfortable
  • Watch a good movie
    • Yes, good movies come from good writers
  • Make notes
    • My memory isn’t what it used to be, sigh…
  • Send emails to myself when I find a good article
    • See above note about memory
  • Write
    • Anything, even if it’s gibberish, edit later
    • write somewhere different, maybe outside

Still can’t write?

Well, here is one of my favorite exercises.

Open a book, any book. Copy the first paragraph. Now rewrite the paragraph making it your own. Change the character, the setting, the action, everything until it is completely different. This never fails to get my imagination going.

What do you do to keep the writing flowing?

To jumpstart your writing process after a break?

Please do share. I’d like to know. Tell me in the comments section.

Go here to “like” my Facebook page. Facebook at jeanswriting To connect with me, click the “write me” tab or follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com, stop by and say hey! The lights are on, and I’m waiting.

Please remember to share this post with your Twitter  peeps and Facebook fans.

Want to know more about getting your writing groove back on? Keep reading!

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When the Stories Have All Stopped By Kimberly Brock 

25 WAYS TO GET YOUR CREATIVE GROOVE BACK AS A WRITER

How to Return to Writing After a Long Break