Want to know why you need to leave a review?

Do you know why this is important?

I mean really important?

It helps a writer? Yes, of course. But there is more to it than that.

When we eat out, we leave the wait staff a tip. Even if the service is lousy, we leave a tip. Might be small, but we leave something behind. The staff worked hard to provide the meal, and our tip our acknowledgment. We may never return to that restaurant again, but that’s okay.

The same thing holds true for a book. The author works hard to produce a product for readers to enjoy. Some will enjoy the story more than others, but everyone should leave behind a tip (review.) Short and sweet, or long and eloquent, leave a review it doesn’t matter.

Don’t know what to say? Here’s a tip: read what others have said and to get ideas, to prime your thoughts into your own words.

Don’t have time to write a wordy review? Click on the stars but leave behind that tip with a one or five star review.

Image Source

Remember to let the author know you read their book. The best way to do that is to write a review. Leaving your footprints in the sands of Amazon and Goodreads is important.

Image Source

What has kept you from leaving a review in the past?

Was it fear? Didn’t like the book? Didn’t know what to say?

Think you could leave a short review now?

Talk to me – I love comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say “hey!”  I’ll leave a light on. 

Keep reading for more about reviews!

Book Reviews: Why They’re So Important to Authors

Why the Right Book Reviews are So Important for Authors

HOW IMPORTANT ARE BOOK REVIEWS?

Advertisements

Do you need to know what to expect?

When you ask someone to read your book?

Well, Evie Gaughan writes on her blog what to do and what to expect for writers.

Reviews: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly 

I couldn’t agree more with her points. Begging for reviews is terrible practice but reviews authors must have.

So how do we keep our dignity?

  • Remember our manners. Say please and thank you.
  • Be gracious, we’re asking a big favor and may not always like the answer.
  • Tell the reviewer how important they are. Authors need reviews.
  • Agreeing to read our books is deserves our gratitude no matter what.
  • Let the reviewer know you value their time.
  • After going for the ask, let it go. Forget about it.

What do you think?

Are we becoming too rude with our expectations?

How do you find reviewers?

Talk to me – I love comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say “hey!”  I’ll leave a light on. 

Do you know where to look?

For that next book idea?

There’s nothing new under the sun.

In other words, no new ideas. Even inventions are the result of a previous idea or invention. One thing always leads to another.

So where do other writers get their ideas?

They steal, from each other and everyone.

From movies, books, TV, newspapers (a great source for SF), or their great Aunt Fanny.

 

Remember, everything old is new again! That’s where.

I know, enough clichés. But you get the point. Click and read this terrific article about Michael Crichton and how he turned the ideas of others into best-selling books with his own twist.

HOW MICHAEL CRICHTON MINED CLASSIC LITERATURE TO WRITE MODERN SCIENCE FICTION 

Talk to me – I love comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say “hey!”  I’ll leave a light on. 

Now, how about you?

Have your ideas been sparked by a favorite movie or book?

Could you take a kernel from it and make it your own?

Keep Reading – More great articles ahead!

How To (Legally and Ethically) Steal Ideas 

Borrowing, Stealing, and Building Upon Other People’s Writing Ideas by

Why You Should Steal From Other Authors by K.M. Weiland

 

To delete now or later that is the question.

One question of so many!

question-1015308_640
Image source

Last week I read a post by one of my fav authors What Am I Working On? Glad You Asked…. His post got me

My internal editor is never quiet.

I go back over and over a chapter, too many times I’m sure before I can continue. Makes my writing process slow as molasses.

What was it about Dan’s post that caught my eye?

Crutch words. Or some of you may know them as filler words.

crutch-words

Dan let his manuscript rest for a year before beginning the editing process and culling out crutch words. Now that’s what I call discipline.

It’s not bad to use these words. They make great place holders for an idea, thought or dialog. However, too many a story makes me look more of an amateur than I am. Don’t know about you but I want my book to appear as polished as possible.

  • So just how do we find crutch/filler words? See, told you I had more questions.
    • Use a word counter to find words used too often as well as adverbs and repeated phrases. Look at the numbers. As all accounts know, numbers don’t lie.
  • How do we replace them? And with what?
    • After you locate the offending words/phrases, decide if a word adds or detracts to your sentence/paragraph. If the story isn’t altered by deleting the words, then you are on the right track.
  • Why should we change them? 
    • Crutch/filler words make our writing lazy. They detract from the flow and crisp dialog. And in some cases, are down right irritating to the reader.

Writers Helping Writers has a great tip sheet of crutch words. [PDF]Crutch Words – Writers Helping Writers. Check out their website for additional writing tools and books.

So tell me, am I the only writer that gets bogged down with editing too soon?

Do you edit as you go or wait as Dan did?

Are you able to silence your internal editor and get the job done?

Sorry if I sound like a two-year-old with all the questions but I’ve got a curious mind. LOL

As always I’ve listed a few articles at the bottom of this post to aid your process.

Leave me a comment – I love comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say, “hey!” I’ll leave a light on. 

Keep reading!

How Crutch Words Are Holding Back Your Writing

How to Identify your Crutch Words and Highlight Your Style