What is the difference between suspense and tension in a story?

I know it’s hard to decide.

Suspense, and tension work hand in glove throughout a good story. The chills, thrills, big and small are what keep us turning the pages.

Here is a reblog of a post from Ryan Lanz and his guest blogger John Briggs about how to add ratchet up tension in your story: 

Favorite Writing Advice: Adding Tension to Your Story

Until recently I always thought I preferred a more direct fast paced action. What changed my mind? A book that was written with page after page of subtle clues that built suspense and tension with emotions.

This book was also written in two of my least favorite formats. Head-hopping and non-linear. You know what I mean. Where each chapter is from a different person’s point of view and the story jumps back and for over a span of time.  Yet, I couldn’t stop reading.

Why? Because I had to find out what happened.

The story is about a neighborhood and the domino effect that happens when one misunderstanding after another leads to problems. Throw in a stalker, control freak, drugs, booze, kids and you have a recipe for one big mess.

Fractured by Catherine McKenzie is a five-star read!

Fractured by [McKenzie, Catherine]

But which do you prefer?

The blood and guts action or subtle building of suspense?

Talk to me – I love reading your comments.

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More great articles for your reading pleasure below!

Suspense versus Tension

What’s the Difference Between Conflict and Tension?

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Do you know how to kill off a character?

Picking a way to kill off a character is not always easy.

I’m dealing with that now. I’ve got a character that’s got to go and another that may need to make an untimely exit.

http://www.pixabay.com

Hmm, poison might work.

If you’re looking for a nasty poison then you will be as thrilled as I was to find Poisoning People for Fun and Profit by Anne R. Allen.

Anne gives us 25 poisons to choose from in a series of posts.

Want to find a poison for your WIP?

Click and start with her latest, Poisoning People for Fun and Profit: Part 25—Yew, and then work your way through the rest.

Have you ever used poison as a way to rid your story of a character?

Which one did you choose?

Or do you prefer something more violent ?

Leave me a comment – I love comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

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Want to know why you need to leave a review?

Do you know why this is important?

I mean really important?

It helps a writer? Yes, of course. But there is more to it than that.

When we eat out, we leave the wait staff a tip. Even if the service is lousy, we leave a tip. Might be small, but we leave something behind. The staff worked hard to provide the meal, and our tip our acknowledgment. We may never return to that restaurant again, but that’s okay.

The same thing holds true for a book. The author works hard to produce a product for readers to enjoy. Some will enjoy the story more than others, but everyone should leave behind a tip (review.) Short and sweet, or long and eloquent, leave a review it doesn’t matter.

Don’t know what to say? Here’s a tip: read what others have said and to get ideas, to prime your thoughts into your own words.

Don’t have time to write a wordy review? Click on the stars but leave behind that tip with a one or five star review.

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Remember to let the author know you read their book. The best way to do that is to write a review. Leaving your footprints in the sands of Amazon and Goodreads is important.

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What has kept you from leaving a review in the past?

Was it fear? Didn’t like the book? Didn’t know what to say?

Think you could leave a short review now?

Talk to me – I love comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

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Keep reading for more about reviews!

Book Reviews: Why They’re So Important to Authors

Why the Right Book Reviews are So Important for Authors

HOW IMPORTANT ARE BOOK REVIEWS?

Do you need to know what to expect?

When you ask someone to read your book?

Well, Evie Gaughan writes on her blog what to do and what to expect for writers.

Reviews: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly 

I couldn’t agree more with her points. Begging for reviews is terrible practice but reviews authors must have.

So how do we keep our dignity?

  • Remember our manners. Say please and thank you.
  • Be gracious, we’re asking a big favor and may not always like the answer.
  • Tell the reviewer how important they are. Authors need reviews.
  • Agreeing to read our books is deserves our gratitude no matter what.
  • Let the reviewer know you value their time.
  • After going for the ask, let it go. Forget about it.

What do you think?

Are we becoming too rude with our expectations?

How do you find reviewers?

Talk to me – I love comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say “hey!”  I’ll leave a light on.