Do you know how to elicit emotions in the reader?

I love it when the perfect articles appear as if by magic to follow-up on one of my posts.

No matter what you are writing, horror, romance, cozy mystery, even a kids book— the reader needs to feel something. They need to become attached and emotional about the characters or plot. And we need to know how to push the right button.

More info about writing with emotion from the experts!

Thanks so much to amazing writers for their great articles.

Want to know how to get a reader to laugh?

Check out – 5 Techniques to Make Your Readers Laugh By Lisa Wells

Want to know how to find an unmet need in your story?

What’s Stronger Than Your Character’s Fear? Their Unmet Need By Angela Ackerman

Want to know how intense to make an emotional response?

Click and read – Leveraging The Emotional Spectrum in Your Writing By

Which emotion do you have trouble expressing in a story?

Do you have a tip to help me get the “feeling” right?

Which emotion does your character express? Is he/she angry, fearful, loving? Which do you write with ease?

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Great reminder on what not to worry about

In other words…

I need to use this as my screen saver. A constant reminder that my first draft doesn’t have to be perfect.

I’ve rewritten the same chapter at least five times. Tweaking a comma here, a comma there, putting commas everywhere only to go back rewrite the sentence and throw out all the commas.

That’s just one example of how I worry over small stuff that should wait until the damn book is finished.

Thanks go out to Janice Hardy over at Fiction University for a great reminder in this terrific post on writing first and fixing last.

Things I want to remember about writing…

  • The novel doesn’t have to be planned and structured to the last detail before I start writing.
  • Complete the thought and don’t worry about crossing every t and dotting every eye. Time for that later.
  • Don’t worry about too many characters in a draft. You can delete those who don’t pull their weight later during editing.
  • Writing a scene where a character has a freak out, don’t worry if’s too over the top. During editing, you can calm her ass down if needed.
  • About world building… Get the world down in that first draft. You can flesh out and make the world more real during editing.
  • It’s okay for my first draft to be a mess.
  • It’s okay that inconsistencies and scattered thoughts fill my first draft. I can yank out anything that doesn’t fit later.
  • It’s okay to throw everything and anything in my novel. Just like dirty dishes, I can wash, dry and put in proper place later.

Click and read this post by Janice and see if you find a few tips to free your creative writing muse.

It’s a Start: What Not to Worry About in a First Draft

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You need to double your Amazon security

You heard right.

Time to double security and protect your books on Amazon. 

Now, not only do I need to work on this year’s taxes, but looks as if I may need to work on my Amazon account.

What the hell? Hackers are now invading Amazon? You’ve got to be kidding me.

I feel as if I’m playing Wack-a-Mole trying to avoid hackers and stupid people. This is getting ridiculous. I change my passwords from time to time, but now I’ve got to do more to keep these crooked jerks out.

 

Thanks to Janice Hardy over at Fiction University for the warning.

Here’s what I learned today about Amazon Security…

  • Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) accounts are linked to my regular Amazon account.
  • Hackers attempt to break into customer Amazon accounts every single day.
  • If a Hacker gains access to my Amazon account they have access to my KDP.
  • A Hacker will change my password, locking me out of all my accounts.
  • Two-step verification is the best way to protect both.
  • Set up two-step verification through my Amazon account.

Two-step verification is a pain in my butt. There I said what most of you are thinking. But getting back control of KDP and the books you’ve slaved over for months is more important.

Click on the link to read the entire article and get step-by-step instructions on how you can protect yourself and your Amazon accounts.

Is Your Amazon Account Secure? By Janice Hardy

Do you use two-step verification with accounts?

Did you realize if a hacker gets into your Amazon account that KDP is toast?

Do you have a security tip you can share?

 

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Do you need to increase your word count?

Hope everyone is enjoying the holidays!

Feeling a bit stuffed? Now you need to write and write lots of words. 

Yes, it’s fun to relax and be with family, but now it’s time to get back on the horse and ride that WIP (work in progress) to the finish line. Or at least around the bend. 

Love, love those Amazon Black Friday deals too! 

But, now that you’ve finished your Black Friday shopping… 

How about a few tips to increase your word count? 

Then check out a post by Janice Hardy (link below). She gives us 3 ways to get the job done faster.

What I liked about her tips…

  1. Take a few minutes and make a list for each scene or chapter.
    • I’m a big list maker. This works better for me than outlines. Listing everything I want to accomplish in a scene gets my mind ticking and my fingers typing. Love this idea.
  2. Write a quick summary of what the POV character wants, and is trying to do.
    • I took a different approach with this tip. I looked at my list and made a quick (2-5 sentences) summary of each item.
  3. Remind yourself why a scene is important. Janice suggests you finish the sentence, I want to write this scene because…
    • Readers need to know is not a good reason. I liked this tip because it can avoid info dumps and bore the reader to death.

Get inspired, click on the link below and read Janice Hardy’s entire post. 

After you read her tips, which ones do you think will help you?

Do you have any tips to help me increase my word count?

Do you worry about word count? 

3 Ways to Boost Your Word Count Every Writing Session by Janice Hardy

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