Do you think technology is good for writers?

Where would you be as a writer without your computer?

Just think about it for a minute. We have come to rely on little electronic robots in every stage of our lives from the grocery store to the gas pumps. So of course, we come to rely on technology to enable us to write faster and better stories.

 

One of my favorite bloggers Ryan Lanz posted an article about robots taking over the world of writers.

The thought made my imagination whirl like a carnival ride.

Not too long ago, we were told computers would make us a paperless society and save the trees. Uh, no hasn’t happened. In fact, I believe it’s had the reverse effect. Yesterday I was at the vets picking up medicine for the dog. The receptionist took forever, or so it seemed, to look up and enter in the computer my information before printing it out in duplicate. No short cut there.

But back to writing. I love many of the automated writing programs. I’ve become dependant on spell-check and use at least three grammar check programs. Some of the books I’ve read or tried to read lately could benefit from a few of these robot programs too. I think this advancement is a good thing.

I agree with Ms. Sotnikova, technology will need for writers to become more creative. We will need to add more of ourselves to our writing, make our stories unique. Separate the man from machine. 

Whether you are analyzing data, running spell-check, or using a program to mimic Hemingway, use the technology to advance your writing skills. To learn, to promote, to help you succeed in every possible way.

I don’t see the robotic age as a negative. No, I see it as a wonderful tool for writers.

Pop over to A Writers Path and read Ms. Sotnikova’s post.

Robots Will Change The Way We Write  By Nadia Sotnikova

What do you think?

Are robots changing the way you write?

Is the coming changes a good or bad thing?

Talk to me, I love reading your comments.

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Is it important for a writer to blog?

Personally, I think it’s up to the individual writer.

So why do it? Why blog? 

Believe me, there are weeks when I consider stopping. And I guess when I no longer enjoy meeting so many talented and informed writers, I’ll stop. But, I’ve learned a lot from each and every one of Y’all.

I also, blog about my learning process. Not an expert, I’m learning as I go and sharing helps me too. Sometimes I think it not only takes a village to raise a child but to develop a good writer. At least in my case. So, for now, I’ll carry on.

Head over to A Writer’s Path and read this article about why blogging important.

Why Blogging is Important for Writers by Shelley Widhalm

Now tell me,

Why do you blog?

Does blogging help or hurt your writing?

I love reading your comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

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Can Mindfulness Be Applied to Writing?

 

Food for thought! reblogged from Ryan Lanz

Source: Can Mindfulness Be Applied to Writing? by Sheree Crawford

Talk to me – I love reading your comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

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What is the difference between suspense and tension in a story?

I know it’s hard to decide.

Suspense, and tension work hand in glove throughout a good story. The chills, thrills, big and small are what keep us turning the pages.

Here is a reblog of a post from Ryan Lanz and his guest blogger John Briggs about how to add ratchet up tension in your story: 

Favorite Writing Advice: Adding Tension to Your Story

Until recently I always thought I preferred a more direct fast paced action. What changed my mind? A book that was written with page after page of subtle clues that built suspense and tension with emotions.

This book was also written in two of my least favorite formats. Head-hopping and non-linear. You know what I mean. Where each chapter is from a different person’s point of view and the story jumps back and for over a span of time.  Yet, I couldn’t stop reading.

Why? Because I had to find out what happened.

The story is about a neighborhood and the domino effect that happens when one misunderstanding after another leads to problems. Throw in a stalker, control freak, drugs, booze, kids and you have a recipe for one big mess.

Fractured by Catherine McKenzie is a five-star read!

Fractured by [McKenzie, Catherine]

But which do you prefer?

The blood and guts action or subtle building of suspense?

Talk to me – I love reading your comments.

Please head over and “like” my Facebook page at Facebook at jeanswriting . Or to connect with me, click the “write me” tab. Don’t forget you can follow me on StumbleUpon,  on Twitter @jeancogdell , and Amazon.com.

Please stop by and say “hey!”  I’ll leave a light on. 

More great articles for your reading pleasure below!

Suspense versus Tension

What’s the Difference Between Conflict and Tension?