Have you lost that new writer feeling?

That love at first written word?

You know what I’m talking about. Don’t act like you don’t. That first blush of prose,  your heart racing with each word you write. Oh, and remember when your first short story or flash fiction story was published? Ah, love sweet love.

Short story, flash fiction, and Drabble – writing the great American novel couldn’t be much harder. Wrong. I have so much to learn.

Thank you, Sacha Black, for your recent post.

7 LESSONS I WISH SOMEONE HAD TAUGHT ME BEFORE I STARTED WRITING

It feels good to realize I’m not the only writer on the planet to stumble through the writing process.

I too had to face the fact, learning takes time. Yes, you can teach an old dog new tricks but it may take a little longer and a lot more patience.

What I gleaned from Sacha’s lessons:

  • I’m not alone. We can all learn to write better.
  • Writing a short story is not the same as writing a novel.
  • Research is a black hole.
  • Studying is a black hole.
  • Reading can suck you into a black hole.
  • BLACK HOLES will distract me from writing.
  • Focus on learning one writing technique at a time.
  • Feedback should come from objective writers.
  • Benchmark what other authors write. Deconstruct specific sections, dialog and figure out the why and how.
  • Break down competition. Covers, chapters, length, etc. How will mine stack up?
  • Make friends. Writer friends who tell me the truth. Sometimes the truth is overrated.
  • Write-I should make more time to write. Shouldn’t we all?

Sacha goes into more detail on her blog, and you’ll probably get something totally different than I did so click and read the whole thing. You’ll be glad you did.

Were you naive when you first began writing?

What have you learned since you wrote your first story/book?

If you could share one lesson with the beginning writer (you), what would it be?

I HOPE YOU TAKE A MINUTE AND FOLLOW ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA, JUST CLICK ON THE BUTTONS BELOW. I’LL LEAVE A LIGHT ON.

    

Do you want a good writing cheat sheet?

I love finding great writing tips!

Thanks, today goes to Patricia Lynne for ways to substitute the word very.

I don’t know about you but sometimes I get into a very rut. I try not to worry about using words like very when in draft mode. But when it comes time to edit, that word needs to get scarce.

And that’s where Patricia’s cheat sheet comes in handy.

If you’re searching for an expression to explain how very excited (psyched) a character is, check out her post and learn how to avoid very. 

Or if you are very tired (weary) of using crutch words you might want to click on  OneLook Reverse Dictionary. Just type in the phrase and up pops suggestions. Give it a try and begin your own vocabulary cheat sheet. Excel and Microsoft Word are perfect for making your own list.

Click and read…

Patricia’s Weekend Pick––Very, very, very  BY 

Do you use cheat sheets?

Have one you’d like to share? Do tell.

Do you edit out most adverbs?

I HOPE YOU’LL TAKE A MINUTE TO FOLLOW ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA, JUST CLICK ON THE BUTTONS BELOW. I’LL LEAVE A LIGHT ON.

    

Do you know the right way to kill a character?

Are you writing a mystery, who-done-it, legal thriller, or suspense story?

Then remember the devil is in the details.

In death, like pregnancy, there are no half-measures. After reading an article by Matt Knight, killing off one of my characters is more complicated than I realized. 

 

What did I learn from Matt?

  • There is a big difference between Murder, Manslaughter, and Homicide. And I need to understand the difference!

Feel free to save the above quick reference. 

His article goes into much more detail. I recommend you click and read. You never know when one of your characters might go off the rails and kill someone.

Murder, Manslaughter, or Homicide – What is the difference? By Matt Knight 

Is any of this new to you?

Are you planning on killing off a character?

Tell me what you think!

I HOPE YOU’LL TAKE A MINUTE TO FOLLOW ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA, JUST CLICK ON THE BUTTONS BELOW. I’LL LEAVE A LIGHT ON.