Want know how to improve your writing?

Dig Deep.

Use ambiguous words.

Did you know the word “break” has 75 different meanings!

Would you like a quick link to help you discover ambiguous words? 

Well, you’re in for a treat. Because I’ve discovered a terrific website that has done most of the work for us. I know, I know we all use dictionary websites but this is totally different. Below is a link for hypernym, hyponym, and synonym of a word. And having all that info at your fingertips might just improve your story. 

Go check it out and let me know what you think.

Could knowing the 51 different ways to use the word “make” help your writing?

Had you ever thought about it before?

Do tell.

Ambiguous Words List By http://muse.dillfrog.com/lists/ambiguous

Want to know more?

Click:     Improve your novel with these tips

 

Don’t forget to look ME up ON SOCIAL MEDIA BY CLICKING ON THE LINKS BELOW.
AND DO STOP BY JEAN’S WRITING ANYTIME, I’LL LEAVE A LIGHT ON. Leave a light on

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Do you know the difference in a prologue and epilogue?

And

How do you know when a story needs one or both?

My current work in progress (WIP) has a short introduction (prologue.) So, I thought doing a little research on the subject might be in order. After all, I do want the reader to read past the first couple of pages. Right?

Here’s what I learned about the two.

  • A writer can use both to bookend a novel or use just one.
  • A prologue is where you can introduce something important to the story.
  • An epilogue is the cherry on top. The ending after the ending.

What I learned about a prologue.

A prologue should include one or all the three elements.

  1. Setting/fictional world and how the character came to be there.
    • Set the stage with a frame of reference for the reader.
  2.  An event key to the story and a character’s response.
    • Describe with action and suspense, not just adjectives.
    • Perfect place to let the event introduce a theme.
  3. Create intrigue.
    • Set up the reader to keep reading.

My WIP prologue includes #2 & 3.

I’ve not given much thought to epilogues before today. Although, I do enjoy reading a good one that wraps up a story. Especially a book that kept me on edge from beginning to end. A good epilogue relieves tension and enables me to tie all the dangling pieces together in one big knot.

What I learned about writing an epilogue.

  1. Wrap everything up into “happily ever after.”
  2. An epilogue can be used to hint or introduce a sequel.
  3. A place for the characters to reflect on the story.
  4. Show growth and change in a character.

Want to know more? Then drop to the end and click on a few terrific links.

But first…

Me Let's Discuss - Jeanswriting.comHave you ever written a prologue or epilogue for a book?

Do you plan on writing either for your WIP?

Do you like reading either in books?

Or, do you think books are better without either one?

What did I forget?

Talk to me in the comments. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

YOU CAN FIND ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA BY CLICKING ON THE LINKS BELOW.
AND DO STOP BY JEAN’S WRITING ANYTIME, I’LL LEAVE A LIGHT ON. 

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Framing the Novel: The Prologue and the Epilogue By Reba White Williams

What is a prologue (and epilogue)? Examples and tips

Parts of a Novel: What is Foreword, Preface, Introduction, Prologue, and Epilogue?

Prologue & Epilogue

 

Do you want a little Monday Morning Motivation?

Well, thanks to Shaunta Grimes I’m sending a little your way.

One piece of perfect advice that will change your life (if you let it.) By Shaunta Grimes on Medium

quote by Ray Bradbury from Jean's Writing

Happy Writing!

You can find ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA BY CLICKING ON THE LINKS BELOW.

And do STOP BY Jean’s writing ANYTIME, I’LL LEAVE A LIGHT ON. 

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What is the image you want to project?

Are you being true to your persona?

Merriam-Webster Dictionary definition:

“the personality that a person (such as an actor or politician) projects in public:  image”

In other words your image. Your image as an author.

Learning how to share on social media can help us improve as writers and bloggers. And possibly sell more books. Now, who doesn’t want that?

Donna Galanti wrote an article that talks about how a writer can present a consistent image to readers on social media, and she really got me to thinking about mine.

I’m not sure I’ve hit the mark with my author persona, yet. But I’ll keep trying.

Donna suggests the image doesn’t need to be genre-based unless that is all you want people to know about yourself.

So how can what can we do to help readers know what to expect?

  • Define and keep up a message that is constant and on target.
  • Share with your peeps what they can expect to see from you.
  • What they see is what they get. 

What can you expect from my blog?

  • Whenever I learn or find something exciting about the writing craft, I’ll share here.
  • I write stories because I love writing. I write a blog post because I love learning and sharing. And I will always try to reflect that love here.
  • I write on this blog because I want to be a better writer.
  • Learning from Y’all, has improved my writing. I do my best to thank you each for your knowledge and expertise.
  • I believe in possibilities, anything can happen and want to encourage other writers with this blog. Who knows, maybe one day we’ll both make the NYT Bestseller list.

According to Donna’s post, I need to update my “about me” page. So that task just got added to my to-do list. Y’all stay tuned and keep an eye out for a new and improved page.

As Shakespear wrote, “This above all: to thine own self be true,…”

Take a gander at Donna’s post and tell me if you’ve hit all the points in her article. Click her link below. And tell me…

Did you see anything to help improve your social media image?

Does your “about me” page tell a story of who you are?

Do your readers know what to expect when they click on your blog?

Do you think that projecting a consistent author persona will help promote your writing and books? 

4 Ways to Create Your Author Persona  By Donna Galanti

I HOPE YOU TAKE A MINUTE AND FOLLOW ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA, JUST CLICK ON THE LINKS BELOW. I’LL LEAVE A LIGHT ON.

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