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Can you really recognize a liar?

We all like to think we can spot a lie from ten paces. But can we really? How many times has someone fooled you?

Ernest Hemingway quote - A writer of Fiction...

Why am I asking about liars? Because knowing how to spot one, is helpful in writing. If we know how people recognize when someone is lying we can use those signs for a villain. The body language of a liar is great fodder for a story.

Add body language of a liar to round out your antagonist.

 So if you bullshit meter needs fine turning then check out this article on this subject…

10 Easy Ways to Recognize Liars by 

Here is the show don’t tell, tips I gleaned about liars.

  • Fails to make eye contact. Looks at the floor, ceiling or hands. Or, make eye contact with an unblinking stare.
  • Avoids using contractions.  “I did not…” instead of “I didn’t…”
  • Answers question with a question to stall for time.
  •  They fidget sometimes excessively with ear, nose, or pockets, purses or play with keys etc.
  • Turn away from the speaker, blink rapidly, smile falters. Cross their arms which is a sign of being “closed” to the subject.
  • Runaway talker. They might embellish their story to make it more believable.
  • Gets angry. Becomes defensive. Tries to divert attention on to another person.
  • Changes the subject to avoid answering a question.
  • Eyes are the big tip-off. Right-handed people will look up and to the left if trying to remember. If trying to make something up, they look to the right.
  • They may blink rapidly or rub eyes.
  • Sweating,  blushing, trembling and difficulty swallowing may indicate a lie.
  • Don’t miss the micro-expressions. A fleeting smile, a furrowed brow, etc. Although quick, these can tell you a lot.

Knowing the signs of a liar is great fodder for a writer.

What do you think? See anything to help with your writing?

Do you have any tips about the body language of a liar? Or truth teller?

How do you describe a lying snake of a villain?

 

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Do you celebrate the big and small?

As writers, we need to remember to celebrate a small success as well as a big one.

No matter what happens, celebrate. Whether it’s words written, a book sold, or great compliment.

When you’ve typed the end! Pop the Cork! Is a really big event.

But don’t forget the little stepping-stones that moved you forward to the big finale.

Such as…

A new idea appeared in your mind as if by magic!

Good review on Amazon.

500 words written, yay!

10,000 words written… Now you’re cooking with gas.

Or as happened for me this past week an amazing compliment.

A friend gave her young grandson a copy of my book A Reluctant Little Prince for his birthday. And…

He insists someone read the book to him every day! And more important, he recognized himself in the story. I’ve been walking on air.

Guys, I don’t know about you, but a little love goes a long way to keep my creative juices flowing.

Each milestone is worth a pat on the back. Keep writing.

Quote by Jon Kabat-Zinn

What keeps you writing?

Do you celebrate the little accomplishments as well as the big ones?

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What do you think about first point of view?

Which do you prefer second, third or multiple?Writers what is best POV?When I first began, writing in first person POV was frowned upon. Many bloggers insisted it was a hallmark of a novice. This was frustrating as hell because I love writing in 1st POV.

Now I understand that’s not what determines you, as a writer. Each writer is unique as is their story. A good story stands out no matter the POV.

There are pros and cons to everything, even the chosen POV. However, good stories are good and the only thing (IMHO) that waves the red flag of a novice is bad editing.

Thanks to one of my favorite bloggers for sharing…

10 Advantages of Writing a Single-POV Story (What I Learned Writing Wayfarer)  by 

Why I like first person POV…

  • Understanding who is narrating the story is simple. No flipping back and forth to refresh my memory on the who.
  • The narrator’s journey gives a closer connection to the POV and story.
  • Focus of the story, plot, and the theme are more direct.
  • Subplots and supporting characters are directly connected to the narrator.
  • Single POV calls for tighter writing. (I love writing flash.)

Bottom line there is no right or wrong POV. We all must be true to the story.

Tell me…

Which POV do you prefer? Why?

Have you tried your hand at the other POV’s?

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Writers, this is tax info you need

If you’re like me, you break out in a cold sweat this time of year.

I’m not sure about other countries, but here in the USA, taxes are due on April 15th. Yikes, it’s gonna be here before you know it.

However, thanks to Jenny Hansen, I think you may feel a little better. She explains everything you need to know (or pretty darn close) to make filing easier this year. So grab your receipts, or call your accountant after you read Jenny’s article. 

Today, instead of breaking down what I gleaned from her blog post, I’m just going to let you click and read for yourself. The subject of taxes is too important for me to screw with it. So please click and read her post. It’s a very informative and a must-read for all writers. 

Take it away Jenny…

Easy Tax Guide for Authors by Jenny Hansen

 

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