How to improve your writing with these simple rules

Do you feel like rules stifle your creativity?

That too many rules, like cooks, ruin the outcome?

Well, following the rules need not be confusing. Thanks to Barbara Delinsky boils down the rules of writing to 5 easy to understand and follow.

  1. Homework.
    • Research will help you write about everything. Thank goodness for Google. Personally, I love researching a new topic. Too bad I get lost in all the cool info.
  2. Likable characters.
    • Everyone loves to cheer on the heroine and boo the villain. Don’t overdo their attributes.
  3. Scene purpose.
    • Write scenes that don’t distract or slow down your story.
  4. Move it, move it.
    • Keep the pace moving forward. Readers prefer heart-stopping speed to eloquent prose.
  5. Edit, and edit some more.
    • Edit everything. Edit typos, flow, context, inconsistencies, repetition, and boredom.

There you have it, my take on How to Write Like Delinsky: Five Rules Of Writing by Barbara Delinsky

Head over and read Barbara’s post and let me know what you think.

Do you follow her rules?

Have one of your own to add?

Are you a rule breaker or follower?

 

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How to write the best opening scene?

How much action is too much?

Writing action in a story isn’t always easy.

At least not for me. Because I’m currently struggling with this very thing. The first couple of chapters have to be right or I can’t move on. I go back and forth trying to get that balance just right.

Writing the balance between action and story in those first few chapters is crucial to hooking a reader. Too much action and I risk exhaustion, too little and I may bore the reader to death.

So where does a story really begin?

I recently read a great article about starting at the true beginning of a story.

“When you are looking for your story’s true beginning, look for the first event that changed your character’s path.” 

Ms. Keller reminds us that we need to connect dots with a change to move our story forward.

Great advice for this writer.

So, seems I need to find the catalyst that changed things for my protagonist and start there. Link events with other changes to propel the story forward. Hmmm. This may be doable.

After I read her article a couple more times or maybe six, maybe I’ll get it. LOL

Click on the link to Ms. Keller’s post below and see what you think.

Opening Action: how to make it work By M.L. Keller

Are her tips helpful to find the true beginning of your story?

Do you think it’s important to write action in the beginning?

Are you guilty of writing too much backstory too soon?

Got any tips for writing a terrific first chapter?

Please share your thoughts!

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How to pick and choose your scenes

One of my favorite ezines now is South West Writers

In today’s email is a great article on how to figure out which scenes in your writing need trimming or maybe cutting.

How do you decide which scenes are working? 

Lorena Hughes gives a lot of information to help a writer make that decision. Hop over and read.

TRIMMING THE FAT (AKA EXPENDABLE SCENES) IN YOUR NOVEL by Lorena Hughes

Happy editing.

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