How do you kill a dream?

Dreams rarely die in a single moment.

No, most dreams die slowly, until like smoke, they drift away.

I do not have a green thumb. My house is where plants come to die. I forget to water, feed or give them the correct amount of sunlight. In other words, I fail to give a plant the attention it needs to thrive.

Lack of attention will kill a dream

That’s how a story dies too. The holidays sidelined my writing. I set aside my WIP to cook, clean and get ready for Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving passed and so did another week. Now Christmas is upon us and next will be New Years.

A couple of days will soon turn into a couple of months. And here I sit. My muse is still whispering in my ear and my characters haunting my sleep. So, no excuse except I dropped my habit of writing every day. More fun to shop for gifts, eat, binge watch holiday movies or curl up with a good book in front of a roaring fire. Sigh…

Quite, reading a good book

Habits are hard to start but easy to break.

Life gets in our way and we stop writing. How to avoid the holidays sidelining your dream of finishing that novel?

  • Steal a few minutes to write just 50 words.
  • Do a quick brain dump of ideas. (I like to use colored sticky notes.)
  • Organize those ideas.
  • Write. Write every day.  If you’re like me, those 50 words will turn into 100 and then 1000 words. Soon you’re writing habit will return.

Sometimes a break from writing is unavoidable and necessary. No one wants to experience burn out. But as with all things in life, moderation is the key.

Don’t let your writing break kill your dream of becoming an author. 

Keep writing.

Want to read more inspiration on getting back in the writing? Click and read the links below.

Does your writing get sidelined by the holidays?

How do you keep your writing momentum?

Do you write every day, even throughout the holidays?

How often and for how long do you take a break from writing?

 

How to Keep Writing Day After Day Without Quitting (Even When You Don’t Feel Like It) By Ayodeji Awosika

 This is What Happens When You Take a Break from Writing By Lindsey Lazarte

Taking a Break from Writing By Jennifer Ellis

3 Reasons You Should Take a Break From Your Writing by Emily Wenstrom

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AND STOP BY JEAN’S WRITING ANYTIME, I’LL LEAVE A LIGHT ON. 

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Do you want to write interesting dialog?

Even when your characters are a bit long-winded?

Well, thanks to Lisa Hall Wilson, I’ve got a few good tips that might help.

Adding beats to your dialog keeps the pace moving. Below are some of her suggestions to get the beats right and keep your reader engaged.

Make every beat count in a story.

  • Show what the character is doing as they speak.
    • Rocking
    • Walking
    • Picking at a thread, twirling hair…
  • Use tone.
    • Soft, loud, hateful…
  • Show how the character is feeling about what is being said.
    • Sad, thoughtful, tense…
  • Show the actions of other characters and ambient noises
    • A minor character walking away, clinching fists…
    • Strangers in the area
    • dishes clinking
    • People singing, arguing…
  • Internal dialogue
    • But, word of caution- don’t overuse or the action will slow down.
  • Avoid too much stage direction with dialogue
    • You don’t want the reader simply observing the scene taking place, like someone in a movie theatre.

Above all –

write beats that move the story forward and engage the reader.

Read more of Lisa’s suggestions for writing great dialogue at this link.

How To Use Beats To Keep Long Dialogue Passages Interesting Even If There’s No Action by 

Writers, what do you think?

Do you write a lot of beats in dialogue?

Get any good ideas for your current work in progress?

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How to brainstorm an outline easy and painless

We brainstorm ideas all the time. But what about the outline?

I have to admit, outlining a story stops my creative process cold.

Tell me to produce an outline and instant flashbacks to grade school haunt my mind. Yuck! Until now, nothing has helped my phobia of outlines.

It all starts with Brainstorming.

If you too have an adverse reaction to outlines, keep reading. Because Joanna Penn gave me the help I needed and hopefully you’ll get a few good tips to help your aversion too.

What I learned from Joanna Penn…

  • Brainstorming helps you outline. (Who knew?)
  • Think of outlining as a writing recipe. A way to organize your thoughts. (this was an AH HA moment for me.)
  • Brainstorming is throwing out ideas and seeing which ones stick. (Freeing.)
  • There are 6 different styles. (Find yours, I’m number 6.)
    • Joanna gives steps for each style.
  • Finding your specific style will help plan/outline your novel.
  • And… Bullet points are my friend. 

Click the link below and find out what style do you use to write.

Now tell me…

Which style did you relate to?

Do you outline before you write?

How do you plan a book? 

 

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Writing Tips: Learn to Love Outlining by Finding Your Unique Planning Style by 

Click image to read an excerpt…

How to avoid murdering your voice and boring the readers

Two words – Conservational writing.

Means: writing to a friend.

So how do you write like you talk without it sounding like crap? Without putting the reader to sleep?

Well, here are a few tips, hope they help.

  • Writing to a crowd can kill your voice.
    • Instead, write as if you are writing to a friend.
    • Imagine your favorite person opening and reading your book, email or text. Will they laugh, cry or close it up unfinished?
  • Conservational writing is not writing like you talk.
    • Messy first drafts are to be expected.
    • Then, edit until your writing doesn’t sound like stuffy writing but like casual conversation.
  • Don’t write to impress
    • Write to be read.
    • Use contractions.
    • Write with common words.
  • Read blogs, contemporary novels and listen to podcasts.
    • Avoid proper English books until ready to edit.
    • Read good conversational writing.
  • Write in short sentences and paragraphs.
    • This helps avoid boring the reader to death.
  • Use the active voice.
    • Avoid passive writing when possible.
  • Read your writing out loud.
    • Record yourself reading.
    • Sounds too formal, rewrite.

Hope these tips helped a little. The articles below go into more depth, be sure and click on the links to read.

Do you imagine a friend when you write?

Do you think conversational writing applies to books, stories as well as blogs?

What tip could you add?

 

15 Tips for Writing in a Conversational Tone

How To Write in a Conversational Tone – A Step-by-Step Guide

How to Write Conversational Content and Make Your Readers Deliriously Happy by 

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https://www.printwand.com/blog/15-tips-for-writing-in-a-conversational-tone